Thursday, March 20, 2014

Missing Malaysia Plane MH370 Update: Thailand Radar Detects Possible Jet; Indian Techie, Taiwanese Student ‘Spot’ Flight on Satellite [Photos]

Picture from Taiwanese Student who has claimed that he found an image of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 (Photo: DigitalGlobe)
A university student from Taiwan has claimed that he found an image of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, by searching satellite images.

The Taiwan China Times reported that the image was sourced from Tomnod, a map search website being used by millions of people in search for the missing plane.

The satellite image that has not been verified by authorities appears to show a plane in the skies, above a jungle in an undisclosed place.

According to DigitalGlobe, which owns Tomnod, more than three million people have participated in the search of an area that now is said to cover around 24,000 square kilometers.

Indian Techie Claims to Have Spotted Possible Plane:

The techie, recognized as Anoop madhav Yeggina found a satellite image of a large aircraft flying very low above the Andaman Islands
An IT analyst from the Indian city of Hyderabad has also said that he stumbled up on a crucial clue, related to the missing plane.

The techie, recognized as Anoop Madhav Yeggina, found a satellite image of a large aircraft flying very low above the Andaman Islands on 8 March, which he believes is the missing Malaysia Airlines plane.

He is among the millions of people involved in the search in the 'crowdsourcing' project to find the plane. The image he found was also posted on CNN, along with a write-up by the techie on 14 March.

However, the finding was rebuked by Mapbox, the company providing satellite images which the techie apparently used to spot the plane. Referring the Indian's satellite image, Mapbox said that the purported signting of the plane was based on old data, India Today reported.

MH370 Fact File:

The wide-body jet, carrying 239 people onboard, was reported to have vanished from the civilian air-traffic control radar in the wee hours of Saturday, only about an hour into its journey from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

While the inability to solve the puzzle surrounding the bizarre disappearance of the plane has become a breeding ground for uncanny theories and explanations doing the rounds on the internet, the event has prompted a massive international air and water search, which so far has not produced any tangible results.